Sunday, April 22, 2012

S.F. Law Library Logo Design Analysis




D E S I G N E R

C L I E N T

B A C K G R O U N D
No description on Hatch's website, but S.F. Law Library's site says: "It is the mission of the San Francisco Law Library to provide the judiciary, the public, the bar, and city, county, and state officials free access and use of legal reference materials in order that they may conduct their legal affairs and preserve their legal rights."

H I G H L I G H T S
Friendly and professional. For what could be a very stoic mark for a government-serving law library (as the library's website design reflects, and unfortunately just smothers the logo), Hatch's execution is very nice. The monoweight line treatment of the hand/book keeps it clean and not busy, and placing it in a unique holding shape adds to it's strength and versatility. The rounded, rectangular shape mimics the linear yet rounded corners in the lines to unite the elements. There are only two level lines in the design (the top of the thumb paralleled with the top edge of the book), while the rest are all angles, which provides interest. The "gestalt-ish" subtraction of the underside of the hand leaves a nice breath of room under the busier portion of the mark. Though it does only present 4 fingers (3 and a thumb :) it is visually completed as a whole hand by the viewers mind---in part due to the visual support of the curved lower edge of the shape leading you along. Reducing it in size does cause the line element to suffer some as it starts to fill in, but that unique holding shape helps create retention of the design to a viewer.